Task Force and Committees

To support the development of the new strategic plan, the university has created a Strategic Planning Task Force as well as four committees addressing each area of the strategic plan's pillars.

Strategic Planning Task Force

Chaired by a trustee and made up of trustees, faculty, staff, student and alumni representatives, the Strategic Planning Task Force has been formed to coordinate the work of the four committees.

Christine Barth

Christine Barth

Trustee; Chair of the Task Force

Peter Harrison

Peter Harrison

Trustee

Donna Hill Stanton

Donna Hill Staton

Trustee

madeleine

Madeleine Jacobs

Trustee

Todd Klein

Todd Klein

Trustee

Chair Grace Speights

Grace Speights 

Chair of the Board of Trustees; Ex Officio 

President Thomas J LeBlanc

Thomas LeBlanc

President; Ex Officio

Ave Tucker

Ave Tucker

Trustee; Ex Officio

Scott Kieff

Scott Kieff

Chair, World-Class Faculty Committee

Gayle Wald

Gayle Wald

Chair, High-Quality Undergraduate Education Committee

Carol Sigelman

 Carol Sigelman

Chair, Distinguished and Distinctive Graduate Education Committee

Alan Greenberg

Alan Greenberg

Chair, High-Impact Research Committee

Sylvia Marotta-Walters

Sylvia Marotta-Walters

Faculty Senate Executive Committee Chair

richard jones

Richard Jones

GW Alumni Association President

SJ Matthews

SJ Matthews 

Student Association President, Undergraduate Student

Haley Gray

Haley Gray 

Presidential Fellow, Graduate Student

Rose Kirk Dunnegan

Rose Kirk Dunnegan 

Chief of Staff, Division of Operations

Anton N. Sidway

Anton N. Sidawy 

Professor and Lewis B. Saltz Chair, Department of Surgery (SMHS)

Kathryn Newcomer

Kathryn Newcomer 

Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration (CCAS)

 

 

Committees

Four committees are addressing the strategic plan’s pillars. Each committee is charged with gathering input from the university community, assessing the current state of its focus area and examining best practices, proposing recommendations to achieve preeminence and identifying challenges to doing so.

Each committee comprises faculty, students and staff representatives, as well as members of the administration in a supporting role. The committees are led by faculty chairs and vice chairs.
 

Guidance to the Strategic Planning Committees

 

World-Class Faculty

Scott Kief

Scott Kieff, Chair

GW Law
Professor of Law

nancy gaba

Nancy Gaba, Vice Chair

School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Professor and Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty

Arshad Ali
Graduate School of Education and Human Development
Assistant Professor of Educational Research

Adele Ashkar
College of Professional Studies
Associate Professor, College of Professional Studies
Associate Dean for Academic Excellence

Lisa Bowleg
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Professor of Psychology
Director of DC CFAR Social and Behavioral Sciences Core

Graciela Kaminsky
Elliott School of International Affairs
Professor of Economics, International Affairs

Tianshu Li
School of Engineering and Applied Science
Associate Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Angie McNelis
School of Nursing
Professor of Nursing
Associate Dean for Scholarship, Innovation, and Clinical Science

Sara Rosenbaum
Milken Institute School of Public Health
Professor of Health Policy and Management

Lisa Schenck
GW Law
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Professorial Lecturer in Law, Director of the National Security Law Program

Gregory Squires
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Professor of Sociology, Public Policy and Public Administration

Jim Wade
GW School of Business
Professor of Strategic Management and Public Policy

Staff

Monica Partsch
Milken Institute School of Public Health
Assistant Dean for Faculty Affairs and Program Development

Deans

Jeff Akman
Vice President for Health Affairs
Dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Anuj Mehrotra
Dean, GW School of Business

Academic Resources

Chris Bracey
Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs
Interim Dean, GW Law

Shelese Smith
Director, Full-time Faculty Personnel Administration

CIBAS Suppport

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate, CIBAS

Sara Williams
Associate, CIBAS

World-Class Faculty

Charge to the Committee:

A world-class faculty is critical to our aspiration for preeminence as a comprehensive, global, research university.  Our ability to meet the many demands of our research and teaching missions requires a thoughtful balance across disciplines and faculty ranks with a focus on engagement in our intellectual community.  Develop a strategy to recruit, retain, and promote an intellectually vibrant faculty that leverages our history, location, and emerging opportunities.  

The process for determining the strategy for world-class faculty should involve consideration of the following two key elements: (1) world-class tenured and tenure-class faculty, and (2) high-quality contract, specialized, adjunct, and part-time faculty.  A baseline set of comparative benchmarking data will be provided to the committee with regularly reported items on faculty in order to inform the committee’s final recommendations.  The committee’s recommendations should adhere to the structure outlined below, include goals and initiatives by responding to the questions embedded within, and suggest metrics and resources required to achieve the goals.  

 

  1. Principles

Provide overarching guidance to be considered and adhered to in addressing the charge to the committee.

  1. Goals

Based on these principles, and in response to the guiding questions below, establish the goals and define specific initiatives to realize the goals.

  • World-class tenured and tenure-track faculty
    • What changes in our university-wide faculty practices and policies (e.g., startup support, spousal hires, core facilities, teaching loads) would help us recruit, promote, and retain the very best faculty?
    • How do we further engage faculty in the life of the university, and help create a stimulating intellectual environment that attracts scholars to the university, and provides opportunities for our faculty to engage with each other and our students?
    • How do we assess the overall quality of the faculty and measure improvement over time?  How do we recognize and celebrate the quality of our faculty
    • What criteria should we use to determine teaching loads, considering class size, advising, research productivity, administrative appointments, and other responsibilities?
  • High-quality contract, specialized, adjunct, and part-time faculty
    • What criteria should we use to assess the proper balance between the tenure-track faculty and the non-tenure-track faculty, including contract and specialized faculty, adjuncts, and part-time faculty?  How does this balance vary by discipline?  How do we recognize, celebrate, and reward extraordinary contributions from our non-tenure-track faculty?
    • In recognition of the District of Columbia’s remarkable number of professional experts interested in teaching, how do we further engage this extraordinary community of professionals in the teaching mission of the university, celebrate their contributions to the classroom, and make their presence a hallmark of a GW education?

 

  1. Metrics

Determine metrics to measure progress toward achieving the goals for faculty under this strategic plan.

  1. Resources

List all resources required, including assumptions, to achieve the goals for faculty.

 

 



High-Quality Undergraduate Education

Gayle Ward

Gayle Wald, Chair

Columbian College of Arts and Sciences
Chair and Professor of American Studies

Jason Zara

Jason Zara, Vice Chair

School of Engineering and Applied Science
Associate Chair for Academic Affairs in Biomedical Engineering

 

 

 

 

Faculty

Lorena Barba
School of Engineering and Applied Science
Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Reid Click
GW School of Business
Associate Professor of International Business, International Affairs

Alex Downes
Elliott School of International Affairs
Associate Professor of Political Science, International Affairs

Majeda El-Banna
School of Nursing
Associate Professor of Nursing
Program Director, RN to BSN/MSN

LaTisha Hammond
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Assistant Professor of Honors and Biology

Tamara Henry
Milken Institute School of Public Health
Teaching Assistant Professor of Prevention & Community Health

Katrin Schultheiss
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Chair and Associate Professor of History

Frank Sesno
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences / School of Media and Public Affairs
Professor of Media and Public Affairs, International Affairs
Director of the School of Media and Public Affairs

Tiffany Sikorski
Graduate School of Education and Human Development
Assistant Professor of Curriculum & Pedagogy

Richard Simons
GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Senior Associate Dean for M.D. Programs
Professor of Medicine

Elizabeth Vaquera
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Associate Professor of Sociology
Director of the Cisneros Hispanic Leadership Institute

Staff

Alex Cromwell
Elliott School of International Affairs
Associate Director, Dean’s Scholars and Experiential Learning

Shira Loev Eller
GW Libraries and Academic Innovation
Art and Design Librarian

Marcus Ware
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Assistant Director, POD 3 & Pre-Law Advisor

Students

Shubham Gupta
School of Engineering & Applied Science

Daniel Kassl
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences

Mikaela Rose Tajo
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences

Deans

Reuben Brigety
Dean, Elliott School of International Affairs

Paul Wahlbeck
Interim Dean, Columbian College of Arts & Sciences

Ex Officio

Cissy Petty
Vice President of Student Affairs and Dean of Students

Tanya Vogel
Director of Athletics

Academic Resources

Terry Murphy
Deputy Provost for Academic Affairs

Ed Gillis
Interim Vice Provost for Enrollment Management

CIBAS Support

Pam Promisel
Senior Associate, CIBAS

Donald Reagan
Manager, CIBAS

High-Quality Undergraduate Education

               

Charge to the Committee:

Under the assumption of a residential undergraduate population of 8400 students, of which 30% ultimately complete a STEM major, develop a strategy with measurable outcomes to attract and retain a high-quality student body, and recommendations for the educational opportunities that we should provide to our students.

The process for determining the strategy for high quality undergraduate education should involve consideration of two key elements: (1) a high-quality undergraduate student body, and (2) a high-quality and distinctive undergraduate education.  A baseline set of comparative benchmarking data will be provided to the committee with regularly reported items on undergraduate education in order to inform the committee’s final recommendations.  The committee’s recommendations should adhere to the structure outlined below, include goals and initiatives by responding to the questions embedded within, and suggest metrics and resources required to achieve the goals. 

 

  1. Principles

Provide overarching guidance to be considered and adhered to in addressing the charge to the committee.

  1. Goals

Based on these principles, and in response to the guiding questions below, establish the goals and define specific initiatives to realize the goals.

  • High-quality undergraduate student body
    • How do we define, recruit, retain, and graduate a high-quality student body?
    • Beyond financial aid strategies, what programs, facilities, and experiences should we exploit or develop to attract and retain this high-quality student body?
  • High-quality and distinctive undergraduate education
    • How do we expand our offerings in STEM education to attract more STEM majors and to provide STEM educational opportunities to all students?
    • How do we make the many distinctive educational opportunities available at GW (including the professional schools) accessible to every student?
    • How do we use our location to create academic offerings and opportunities that are available at no other institution?

 

  1. Metrics

Determine metrics to measure progress toward achieving the goals for undergraduate education under this strategic plan.

  1. Resources

List all resources required, including assumptions, to achieve the goals for undergraduate education.

 

 

 



Distinguished and Distinctive Graduate Education 

Carol Sigelman

Carol Sigelman, Chair

Columbian College of Arts and Sciences
Professor of Psychology

Liesl Riddle

Liesl Riddle, Vice Chair

School of Business
Associate Dean of Graduate Programs

 

 

 

 

Faculty

Paula Alonso
Elliott School of International Affairs
Associate Professor of History, International Affairs

Elias Balaras
School of Engineering and Applied Science
Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Brandon Bartels
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Associate Professor of Political Science

Steve Charnovitz
GW Law
Associate Professor of Law

Mike Corry
Graduate School of Education and Human Development
Professor of Educational Technology
Director of the GW Online High School

Matt Dallek
College of Professional Studies
Professor in Graduate School of Political Management

Cynthia Dowd
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Alison Hall
GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Professor of Neurology
Associate Dean for Research Workforce Development

Melissa Napolitano
Milken Institute School of Public Health
Professor of Prevention and Community Health, Exercise Science

Kym Rice
Columbian College of Arts and Sciences / Corcoran School of the Arts and Design
Associate Professor of Museum Studies
Interim Director of the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design
Director of the Museum Studies Program

Pamela Slaven-Lee
School of Nursing
Clinical Associate Professor of Nursing
Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Staff

Gabrielle Julien-Molineaux
Graduate Enrollment Management

Students

Emma Backe
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences

Morgan Byrne
Milken Institute School of Public Health

Olivia Gant
GW School of Business

Deans

Christopher Deering
Interim Dean, College of Professional Studies

Michael Feuer
Dean, Graduate School of Education and Human Development

Lynn Goldman
Dean, Milken Institute School of Public Health

Academic Resources

Terry Murphy
Deputy Provost for Academic Affairs

Cheryl Beil
Associate Provost for Academic Planning and Assessment
Assistant Research Professor of Psychology

CIBAS Support

Denita Acker
Associate, CIBAS

Distinguished and Distinctive Graduate Education

Charge to the Committee:

Our doctoral education and professional graduate education play vital roles in enhancing the reputation of the university.  Develop a strategy to identify, resource, and elevate ten doctoral programs to national preeminence (placing each program within the top quartile of comparable programs), as well as a strategy and criteria for the creation, evaluation, and termination of professional graduate degree programs.

The process for determining the strategy for a distinguished and distinctive graduate education should involve consideration of two key elements: (1) distinguished doctoral education, and (2) distinctive professional graduate education.  A baseline set of comparative benchmarking data will be provided to the committee with regularly reported items on graduate education in order to inform the committee’s final recommendations.  The committee’s recommendations should adhere to the structure outlined below, include goals and initiatives by responding to the questions embedded within, and suggest metrics and resources required to achieve the goals. 

 

  1. Principles

Provide overarching guidance to be considered and adhered to in addressing the charge to the committee.

  1. Goals

Based on these principles, and in response to the guiding questions below, establish the goals and define specific initiatives to realize the goals.

  • Distinguished doctoral education
    • What criteria should we use to evaluate doctoral programs that enhance the reputation of the university, and are, or could be, preeminent given our resource limitations?
    • To what extent should the university support doctoral programs that are not preeminent and are unlikely to become preeminent given our resource limitations? 
    • What criteria should be used to create, merge, scale back, or eliminate a doctoral program?
    • How do we use our location to create graduate programs that are available at no other institution?
  • Distinctive professional graduate education
    • What role should market demand (from both students and employers) play in the creation, evolution, and termination of professional graduate programs?
    • What criteria should be used to create, merge, scale back, or eliminate a professional graduate program? 
    • What unique attributes should a professional graduate program offer to provide a competitive advantage and be distinctive?

 

  1. Metrics

Determine metrics to measure progress toward achieving the goals for graduate education under this strategic plan.

  1. Resources

List all resources required, including assumptions, to achieve the goals for graduate education.

 

 



High-Impact Research

Alan Greenberg

Alan Greenberg, Chair

Milken Institute School of Public Health
Chair and Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Diana Burley

Diana Burley, Vice Chair

Graduate School of Education and Human Development
Professor of Human and Organizational Learning 

 

 

 

 

Faculty

Tyler Anbinder
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Professor of History

Katherine Chiappinelli
GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Assistant Professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine

Tom Colby
GW Law
Professor of Law
Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development

Emilia Entcheva
School of Engineering and Applied Science
Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Jeanne Geiger-Brown
School of Nursing
Professor of Nursing
Associate Dean for Research

Neil Johnson
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Professor of Physics

Henry Kaminski
GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Chair and Professor of Neurology

Nirbhay Kumar
Milken Institute School of Public Health
Professor of Global Health

Annamaria Lusardi
GW School of Business
Chair and Professor of Economics and Accountancy

Jay Shambaugh
Elliott School of International Affairs
Professor of Economics, International Affairs

Chet Sherwood
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
Professor of Anthropology

Staff

Graham Cornwell
Elliott School of International Affairs
Associate Dean, Research

Students

Sonali Bahl
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences

Danielle Gilmore
Columbian College of Arts & Sciences

Deans

John Lach
Dean, School of Engineering and Applied Science

Pamela Jeffries
Dean, School of Nursing

Geneva Henry
Dean, GW Libraries and Academic Innovation

Academic Resources

Robert Miller
Vice President for Research

Gina Lohr
Senior Associate Vice Provost for Research

CIBAS Support

Leslie Roe
Associate, CIBAS

Donald Reagan
Manager, CIBAS

High-Impact Research

Charge to the Committee:

Building on the work of the Strategic Initiative for Research and the Faculty Senate Research Committee and its recommendations to improve the research ecosystem, the university has established the foundation to support large-scale, interdisciplinary team research efforts, and identified the shared facilities and opportunities that would benefit the greatest number of disciplines.  Develop a strategy for improving research productivity across the university that addresses all disciplines and exploits the unique opportunities available at GW.

The process for determining the strategy for high impact research should involve consideration of two key elements: (1) university-wide, interdisciplinary team scholarship, and (2) university-wide core facilities and opportunities.  A baseline set of comparative benchmarking data will be provided to the committee with regularly reported items on research in order to inform the committee’s final recommendations.  The committee’s recommendations should adhere to the structure outlined below, include goals and initiatives by responding to the questions embedded within, and suggest metrics and resources required to achieve the goals. 

 

  1. Principles

Provide overarching guidance to be considered and adhered to in addressing the charge to the committee.

  1. Goals

Based on these principles, and in response to the guiding questions below, establish the goals and define specific initiatives to realize the goals.

  • University-wide, team scholarship
    • How do we enhance a research ecosystem that supports large-scale team efforts across multiple schools and colleges?
    • How should we support team research to achieve a five-year goal for growth in team scholarship?
  • University-wide core facilities and opportunities
    • Should GW develop facilities to support classified research and actively pursue opportunities for classified research?
    • How should the university exploit the emerging field of data analytics in support of scholarship across all disciplines?
    • In addition to building on our historical local partnerships (e.g., the federal government), how should the university engage with the surrounding technology community, including the new Amazon headquarters?
  1. Metrics

Determine metrics to measure progress toward achieving the goals for research under this strategic plan.

  1. Resources

List all resources required, including assumptions, to achieve the goals for research

Committee Engagement

To solicit feedback from the GW community, the committees will offer multiple avenues for engagement, including town halls and other meetings as determined by the committee. The university community will receive more information about these opportunities as it becomes available. 

Timeline

Committees will prepare interim reports, including principles, metrics and a proposed set of recommendations, and share them with the university community in January 2020. The committees will present their final recommendations to the Board of Trustees in May 2020. The board will then consider how to harmonize those recommendations with budget planning and campus and facilities planning before voting on a final strategic plan at its meeting in late June 2020. View the detailed timeline.

Get Involved

We encourage all members of the university community to follow the work of the committees, participate in campus discussions and share their ideas for moving GW forward. 

 

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